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Hip Hop Cookbook

http://www.formfiftyfive.com/2014/09/rappers-delight-the-hip-hop-cookbook/

Rapper’s Delight: The Hip Hop Cookbook is created by Joseph Inniss, Peter Stadden and Ralph Miller.

The book features 30 recipes inspired by well known current and past Hip Hop artists.

Each of the recipes is then accompanied by artwork created by up and coming UK illustrators.

Snoop Stroganoff spread from Hip Hop Cookbook

Split into three categories (starters, mains and desserts) the book includes a wide range of recipes such as Wu-Tang Clam Chowder, Public Enemiso Soup, Run DM Sea Bass and Busta Key Lime Pie.

LL Cool Souffle spread from Hip Hop Cookbook

Vext Issue No. 1

Working for a committee is fraught with problems. You will undoubtedly be asked to combine (Frankenstein) your ideas. Nobody will ever agree on colours. There is a saying that goes something like, “In all of the parks, in all of the cities, I’ve never seen a statue of a committee.” You need one main point of contact and someone who has the authority to make a decision.

Def Jam

Simmons and Rick Rubin founded the pioneering hip-hop label Def Jam in 1984. Although he made his fame promoting music that celebrates a street-tough lifestyle, Simmons grew up in a comfortable middle-class home in Queens, New York. He first heard rap while he was working on a sociology degree at City College in Harlem, New York. In 1977, he began promoting rap parties in Harlem and Queens with his friend Curtis Walker. Like rock ‘n’ roll, rap was initially dismissed as a fad. But Simmons knew different. At his parties, he saw a new and lasting subculture emerging. The following year, Walker became a rapper himself, changing his name to Kurtis Blow, and he and Simmons co-wrote a minor hit called “Christmas Rappin’.”

After this small success with Blow, Simmons left his studies at City College. In 1979, he formed Rush Communications and began managing other local rap acts. One of the most successful of Simmons’ acts was his younger brother, Joey, who went by the name of Run. Putting his brother together with MC Darryl McDaniels and DJ Jason Mizell, he christened the group Run DMC, dressed them in black leather suits and told them what to record. On a street level, the group’s first two records were instant hits.

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